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generation starting to use their hands more and work together in communities and share ideas a little more. digital tools -- he created a magazine for the movement. baker affairs which are hugely successful, 100,000 people come over the weekend, there was one in new york a couple weekends ago. the maker of movement was something they identified first, leading edge tech publishers, so not incidental that they spotted this was technologically driven ball so -- i hope tim o'reilly will forgive me the roots are in the 60s kind of social change, power of the people. they have their roots in the country and recognize justice steve jobs it a cultural revolution under this as well. it was a combination of digital technology and new tools allowing people to do extraordinary things and the recognition that people want to use their hands. we are all makers on something. if you r cook your maker. if you our gardener you are a maker. kids are born makers. there is the dignity in holding something made in your hand but we didn't have the skills to do this stuff. most of us didn't have the skills and wha
us a lot about the state of the consumer and the u.s. economy today. so we're turning to one of the most seasoned and respected voices on wall street for help. we have dana telsey. she is our guest host for the next three hours. andrew, i'll send it over to you. >> we begin with a visit to toyland and here is toys r us. it opened its doors at 8:00 last night. and we have toys r us ceo joining us right now from the company's flagship store in times square. good morning. >> good morning. >> so i read a report you you had a big line. what's it been like all evening? >> it's been great. we did have a big line. we're at 44th and broadway.line went all the the way to 45th street and then down 45th all the way to 6th avenue. it was huge. people came in in a real celebratory mood. people ate ice cream, relaxed with their kids. i've never seen a black friday like this before, but 8:00 hour worked really well for families. >> let's talk about sales. how did it go overnight? >> we're just starting. this is 5:00 a.m. on black friday morning. we're really just starting. we have about a b.
in the living rooms for all of you. lots to get to this morning. but let us not waste any time in wishing our dear colleague, robin roberts, a very happy birthday, robin. [ applause ] >> she's only 40. it's a big one. >> if my 40, you mean 21. happy birthday, robin. i hope you gave yourself a little time to sleep in. >>> meanwhile, we do have a lot for you. we're going to have a star-studded birthday spectacular for her. as george, and lara and sam are enjoying time with their families. >>> we hope you had a beautiful thanksgiving day. now, it's black friday. look at all of the stores all over the country that are already open for business. we're going to get the experts' take on what the hottest toys are. and whether or not you should be buying some of these items. believe it or not, by this time on friday, black friday, some things are already gone. you shouldn't buy them. >> you would think it was the last television set ever made. >> it's a little frenetic. >> i have a hard time getting into the minds of the people who get up and storm the stores. >> there's a big debate on whether that's
that no one on around them cares because no one was asked of the rest of us. if we did not have someone in that war, or if we did not know someone in that war, it could be out of sight, out of mind. we were not asked to make any sacrifices. the war just went on, fought by these brave young american men and women, representing the cross section of this immigrant nation in terms of where they come from. that is immoral for a democratic society to allow that. we have an opportunity to begin to correct the course. welcome them home with a sign at the airport. make sure that they feel that they are a part of our civilian society. that they have an opportunity to find a job, be educated, raise their families, and have the kind of services so many of them need to deal with their physical wounds as well as their emotional wounds. we also have to remember that many of them are coming home whole wanted to make a contribution to their society. there are not victims. they are proud of what they do and with good reason. we open this session with two of our finest military men, two career officers wh
place. from the perspective of the palestinians, they told us they were going out to their farmland and as they approached the fence, that's when they came under attack. there was no mention of them attempting to breach the fence or attack the soldiers on the israeli side. for journalists, we're not even allowed to enter that area. we would be exposed to the threat of israelis who maintain a very strict no go zone area. palestinians thought they could do it and certainly that's what led to the incident today. >> okay. ayman mohyeldin, thank you for that. >>> special correspondent martin fletcher, martin, with a good day to you, to the israeli forces and what they're saying about the charges that they broke the ceasefire. what's from them? >> reporter: well, the israelis, as mark regev said, they are investigating. in these situations there's a shooting, somebody gets killed and then each side is very quick to put their spin on the story and ayman told you what the palestinians are saying. all i can add to what ayman said is reuters, the reuters news agency, the palestinian reporter
and a chaplain will get out. that was a template for what military families go through. the rest of us do not have that kind of fear. what we do have is not just the opportunity but the application to reach out to those families -- but the obligation to reach out to those families and these returning veterans. we could not have had two better representatives of the military services than general powell and general mcchrystal. they took ust -- us through our common oblication. -- obligation. thank you all very much. [applause] one of the many privileges in my life is the range of people i am able to meet. early on as these wars were not winding down, i have two young men talk to me about their mission. they had served in the military services. paul rieckhoff is the founder and executive director of iraq and afghanistan war veterans of america. the first really major organization to address the problems that bring us here. he did not have to go into the army. he did not have to serve in iraq, he did as a first lieutenant. he went to am worse. -- amhers -- amhurst. he served as an army firs
he had a number of times when he used the word nigger, not to insult black people, but to turn the table on people who were antiblack in their feeling and he used the word nigger to laugh at them. using the word nigger as a mirror on race simple in order to combat racism. adore used the word anythinger in some of her short stories. she wasn't using it to be a racist. rather, she was using is as an artist to de-legitimate race simple. that's what i meant. obviously there are black people, too who have used the term nigger in ways that in my view, are completely unobjectionable. dick gregory titled his first autobiography, "nigger "an autobiography." and richard pryor with two great albums, "that nigger is crazy" and bicentennial nigger." >> host: when you wrote the book, it was published in 2002. what reaction did you get? >> host: when i do. >> guest: when i wrote the book i got a lot of reaction, some positive and some negative. and continue to get some positive reactions and negative reactions. some people took real offense at the title. if there was one aspect of the book th
that i don't believe that technology is always the answer to everything. the language i use is to say that the internet and its success is a role model for us, but it's not necessarily the cure to all our problems. we can look at it and is say, wow, we built that together. what else could we do that would be like that? but it does create these issues, and, you know, on the one hand we can look at privacy and say, sure, these corporations know a lot more about us, but it means the ads we're seeing are actually more relevant to us, and we're actually not just being spammed by people, we're seeing targeted things based on our taste. on the other hand, we have to be more aware as a society, and we have to build systems that let us know where our information is being shared. so it's not that all this stuff is head anything a positive direction -- heading in a positive direction, but if we're smart about it and we're optimistic and we apply ourselves and use some of these principles, there's a lot of reason to be hopeful about what we can do. >> host: and finally, michael e-mails in, do you
of palestinians in a buffer zone near the gaza-israeli border. sarah seidner joining us from jerusalem. sarah, no one disputes that israelis soldiers opened fire, but israel and hamas have very different views about the eths that led up to that shooting. what is each side saying? >> well, the department of health there, the ministry in gaza, is saying that these were farmers, they were out, and ended up being fired upon, but the israeli military says that these were several groups of men coming up protesting, coming up to the border fence, trying to go over to the israeli side of the border. that the soldiers fired warning shots in the air initially. when those warnings were not heeded, they ened up shooting towards their legs. the government in gaza is saying that they had killed one person and that the israeli soldiers injured 25 people. the israeli military right now not confirming that. just saying that they are investigating the potential injuries and proteshl death that may have been caused by israeli soldiers. the situation a bit of a tense one. as you know, we are now coming up to 48
away from a million. "old friends" is the category. even though you might use email today, you can still get paired up with a friend and exchange letters as a what? >> i remember having one in elementary school. pretty sure it's "b," final answer. >> i had one too. that's right, pen pal. let's put some more money in your bank. how much is behind this question? $5,000. >> all right. >> up to $12,100. 10 away from a million. "first touch" is your next category. before atms and iphones, england's e.a. johnson developed touch screen technology in the 1960s to be used by whom? >> i've never heard of england-- of e.a. johnson. a lot of them make sense. i'm actually studying air traffic control and i haven't heard of him, so i don't think it's "b," but... [sighs] it seems like a risky one, but i think i'm gonna ask the audience. >> okay, audience, david needs your help. on your keypads, vote now. [percussive music] ♪ oof. 42% say meteorologists, 33 for air traffic controllers, 20 for telephone operators. >> that's interesting. i didn't get anything clear out of that so it wasn't somethi
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10